Dry Brushing…Is it For You?

dry brushingSo what is dry brushing and why is it important?

Actually, it’s simple and there are lots of reasons to dry brush. Let’s start with your skin. Aside from being one of your organs of detoxification, skin is also the second largest organ in your body.  Often times, it appears to be the first to show degeneration or imbalances and the last to heal.  It weighs almost twice as much as the brain. And it receives one third of the circulation of the blood.  Its functions include:

  • Works as a protective shield to the body structure
  • Helps to regulate body temperature
  • Works as a respiratory organ
  • Performs absorption activities by assimilating oxygen and other nutrients
  • Aids in elimination of toxic wastes from the body

As your skin is an important, vital, breathing organ. Therefore, you should always be careful of what you put on your skin.  Although the skin offers us the first protective “coat”, most substances are absorbed to some extent through your skin into your lymphatic and cardiovascular systems.  If the substance happens to be a chemical, a toxin or a poison, your liver and kidneys will have the job of trying to neutralize any adverse effects.  Prolonged daily or chronic exposure to such substances can be very damaging to your health.  Therefore, if your job includes such exposures, you would be wise to take precautions to minimize the absorption of such toxins through your lungs or skin.

The skin is the so-called third kidney.  It works in conjunction with the kidneys in water regulation.  Interestingly, perspiration and urine are chemically very similar. Both contain substantial amounts of uric acid, an important waste product of metabolism. And thus, one more substance for the body to eliminate.

A primary function of the skin occurs through the activities of its pores.  Every square inch of the skin contains hundreds of these pores; all of which are made up of tiny muscles that must be exercised to rid toxins from the body. Hmm…did you ever think of exercising the tiny muscles in your pores?

Underneath the skin lies the vast lymphatic system. This is a rich network of tissues and organs whose main role is to move lymph, which contains infection-fighting white blood cells, throughout the body. And secondly, the lymphatic system helps the body eliminate toxins and endogenous waste; therefore, improving many aspects of the body’s overall function. The challenge is that the lymphatic system needs movement in order to stimulate the flow. And so that’s where dry brushing comes in. Dry brushing offers a much needed form of stimulation to get the lymph moving.

Why dry brush?

  • Stimulates the lymphatic system to move toxins and cellular waste to the liver for elimination.
  • Activates the lymphatic system, which improves immunity.
  • Stimulates the hormone and oil-producing glands in the skin
  • Removes dead skin cells and cleanses pores making skin healthier and vibrant
  • Keeps the skin soft, supple and youthful
  • Improves circulation, thereby aiding the entire body
  • Improves muscle tone
  • Supports the nervous system through stimulation of nerve endings
  • Improves overall health and vitality

And so here’s how it’s done….

  • Use only a natural sponge, vegetable or soft boar bristle brush or loofah sponge.
  • Ideally dry brush every day before taking a shower, a sauna or going to bed.
  • Using either short strokes, a circular motion or figure eight motion, brush very lightly over the entire outer surface of your body.
  • Brush from the head, the tips of the fingers, the tips of the toes toward the heart.
  • Be sure to include your palms and soles but avoid the face as its skin is too delicate for a dry brush.
  • Brush for 45 seconds to 2 minutes.
  • Clean the brush every few days with soap and warm water, which keeps it hygienic.

Who can benefit from dry brushing?

Everyone! Happy dry brushing!

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